Keep your Facebook and Twitter pages safe

By Peter Lambert | August 16, 2019

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An organisation's social media presence online is an important asset built up over time. These assets build trust in your brand and add to your Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) popularity. Due to their importance, it's necessary for you to protect them as you would any internal system. Here are some tips on what you can do to protect your Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Lock your PC when you leave it

Lock all of your computing devices as soon as you stop using them. This way, you are safe from the simplest hack of all: someone opening a browser on your computer that has your social media login saved. 

Strong passwords are never out of fashion

Unlocking your phone may be limited to a six-digit passcode, but you’ll need something much more complicated for your account password. Create a password that you don’t use for any other account because with the regular occurrence of data breaches, hackers probably already have a long list of your favorite passwords from other websites and platforms. 

It is best to use a password manager like an app or online service that allows you to generate and retrieve complex passwords.

You can also enable two-factor authentication, which requires a secondary verification step such as a code sent to your phone. Even if hackers have your password, they won’t be able to log in without your phone.

Make use of social media features

Facebook can help you keep tabs on who’s accessing your account and from where. Click on the down arrow located at the upper right corner of your Newsfeed and select Settings. Then click Security and Login to get more information. If you sense an imposter, click the right-hand icon so you can log out remotely or report the person.

From there, turn on Get alerts about unrecognized logins to get notifications via Facebook, Messenger, or email if someone is logged into your account from an unrecognized browser. Unfortunately, Twitter doesn’t have the same option (which makes two-factor authentication extremely necessary).

Hackers can also barge into your Facebook and Twitter accounts through third-party services that you’ve given access to your profiles, so make sure to double-check what you have approved.

  • Facebook: Go to Settings > Apps and Websites to view and manage outside service with access to your account
  • Twitter: Go to Settings and Privacy > Apps to check and edit the list

Lastly, be sure to check the permissions Facebook and Twitter have on your smartphone or tablet.

  • Android: Go to Settings > Apps > App permissions
  • iOS: Go to Settings > Privacy to manage which service can access which parts of your phone

Less personal info, fewer problems

These steps are just the beginning of what you should be doing. You should also limit the personal data you input into your social media accounts. Avoid oversharing.

By following these tips, you can prevent Facebook and Twitter hacking. 

Need help with cybersecurity?

Our Technology Consultant and Business Technology Manager (BTMs) teams are experts in protecting your digital assets both on premise and online. If you need our assistance, call us on 1300 307 907 or contact us via the form below.

 

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 Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

TAGS: Tech Trends and Tips, Business Value, IT Security

About Peter Lambert
Peter Lambert

Marketing specialist and technical blogger @ Diamond IT - I have over 25 years of experience in Information & Communications systems. My range of skills is diverse and includes extensive experience in desktop solutions, server and network presales and administration, VOIP phone systems, journalism, creative writing, technical writing, digital videography and audio visual streaming. I hold a Certificate IV in Training and Assessment, and I am an experienced classroom trainer and course coordinator. I hold an Advanced Diploma in Network Security, a Diploma in Network Administration, and a Certificate IV in Networking. I am a Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) and Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA).